CPSC 183: Introduction to Law & Technology
Brad Rosen (brad.rosen@yale.edu)
Fall 2011: M W, 4:00-5:15, DL 220

CPSC 183 is a class that is open to non-majors.  You do not need a background in tech or computer science to enjoy the class.  The class offers some project options for CS majors as well.

As a general rule, we will adapt the syllabus to take into account current events.  We may need to add supplemental readings if breaking news changes the topics being discussed.   Please review the syllabi from previous years: 2009 and 2010.  These should give you a flavor of what the class will ultimately look like.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

2011 Midterm Video Links

The following individuals comprise the CPSC 183 teaching team:

  • Teaching Assistants (TAs)
    • Xiyin Tang (xiyin.tang@gmail.com)
    • Robert Gray (robert.gray@yale.edu)
    • Adam Hockensmith (adam.hockensmith@yale.edu)
    • Lauren Thomas (lauren.thomas@yale.edu)
    • Isabella More (isabella.more@yale.edu)
    • Yoni Cohen (yoni.cohen@yale.edu)
  • Course Assistants (CAs)
    • Joel Sircus (joel.sircus@yale.edu)
    • Adi Kamdar (adi.kamdar@yale.edu)
    • Evin McMullen (evinmcmullen@gmail.com)
    • Stephanie Rivkin (stephanie.rivkin@yale.edu)
    • Sebastian Park (airizel@gmail.com)
  • Legal Research Fellow
    • Christopher Nofal (christopher.nofal@gmail.com)

Please note: the course topics and speakers are subject to change as the semester progresses and due to speaker availability.   After the start of the semester, we will post the provisional syllabus here, but you should pay attention to announcements in class and check back here in case there are changes.

Course Wikipedia Page

1.) Introduction:  Freedom, Paywalls, and “Hacking” & Intro to Wikipedia – 8/31

[Note: Time will be set aside to discuss an overview of the course, as well as grading and what you can expect.  These readings are to stimulate a class discussion.]

2.)  The Past and Future of Cyberlaw – 9/5

3.) The Past and Future of Cyberspace – 9/7

  • Jonathan Zittrain, The Future of the Internet — and How to Stop It (Chapters 1, 2 – p. 11-35)
  • U.S. v. Morris (Concentrate mainly on the “Facts” section, don’t worry if you don’t understand some of the more complicated issues in the “Discussion” section)
  • Jack L. Goldsmith, Against Cyberanarchy, 65 U. Chi. L. Rev. 1199 (1998) [excerpt]

4.) “15 Minutes of Fame”  - 9/12

5.) Introduction to Digital Copyright and Fair Use – 9/14

6.) Fair Use Part Deux and the DMCA – 9/19

7.) Fair Use and Remix Culture – 9/21

8.) P2P Law and “Piracy” – 9/26

9.) DRM and Anticircumvention – 9/28

10.) Free Software, Patents, Copyleft – 10/3

11.) Entrepreneurship in the Digital Economy – 10 /5

12.) Memes & Online Communities – 10/10

13.) Intro to Free Speech – 10/12

14.) Defamation and Hate Speech - 10/17

15.) Censorship I — Leaks and Creeps - 10/19

16.) Censorship II & Great Walls – 10/24

17.) Search and Seizure in the Digital Age  – 10/26

18.)  Wikipedia, Collaboration, & Network Effects – 10/31

19.) Privacy: Who Can You Trust? – 11/2

20.) Privacy in the Web 2.0 World – 11/7

21.) Net Neutrality – 11/9

22.) Online Journalism and the “New Content” – 11/14

23.) Anonymity & Online Identity – 11/16

24.) Innovation vs. Applianciziation – 11/28

The remainder of the courses listed below are still subject to change.  We will try to finalize all readings and course order at least 1 week before the course, but we sometimes cannot because of guest speakers.

25.) The Future of Education & Knowledge – 11/30